Saturday, August 28, 2010


In case you weren't looking, two terrific new movies opened up in town yesterday, each very different from the other, and both guaranteed to cure your end-of-summer blahs.

MAO'S LAST DANCER It's really a tale of two dancers. One, Li Cunxin, a peasant boy plucked out of his rural Chinese village and sent to the Beijing Arts Academy toward the end of the Mao Zedong regime, became one of the most prominent ballet dancers in the world. The other, Chi Cao, is the phenomenal young Chinese ballet star who plays Li in Bruce Beresford's heartfelt, rewarding film. Scripted by Jan Sardi (Shine) from Li's autobiography, the film sticks to the highlights of Li's incredible journey, but dramatic resonance and Beresford's beautifully shot dance sequences keep the viewer enchanted. (Read more)

THE DISAPPEARANCE OF ALICE CREED There are few things more exciting in moviegoing than finding a truly original film by someone you've never heard of before. Think back to the first time you saw Christopher Nolan's Memento, say, or Bryan Singer's The Usual Suspects. Remember that feeling of, "Wow, where did this guy come from?" You may get that same hit of awe, coupled with a gleeful sense of discovery, when watching The Disappearance of Alice Creed, a gutsy, disturbing, scrupulously well-honed little thriller from rookie British auteur J Blakeson. (Read more)

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